Blockchain: Green building blocks

FREE: How soon will #blockchain be adopted across the #energy sector?  #OOTT

  • Two years ago, we decided to open a new company, Grid Singularity, with the purpose of further developing the blockchain technology suitable for energy markets.
  • A. Bitcoin, which is a currency, was the first use of blockchain technology and is the most well-known.
  • Blockchain technology reduces transaction costs by keeping a single logical copy of transaction records.
  • It is a non-profit organisation whose mission is to accelerate the commercial deployment of blockchain technology in the energy sector and fund the development of core technology.
  • The internet is only a copy of existing business models, but blockchain means you can exchange information or contracts peer-to-peer, it’s a direct challenge to companies like Google.

A. I was a mechanical engineer, and worked for the energy group ABB in Austria for six years. I first dived into blockchain five years ago, working with bitcoin mining, and then I supported the development of Ethereum which received $18m in crowdfunding and then took one and a half years to build. It is still so far the most advanced blockchain platform. Two years ago, we decided to open a new company, Grid Singularity, with the purpose of further developing the blockchain technology suitable for energy markets.
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Solar Experiment Lets Neighbors Trade Energy Among Themselves

Solar energy? Meet blockchain. @nytimes

  • Across the globe, upstart companies like LO3 Energy, which is designing the Brooklyn experiment with the industrial giant Siemens, are building digital networks that offer the promise of user-driven, decentralized energy systems that can work in tandem with the traditional large-scale grid or, especially in emerging economies, avoid the need for a grid at all.
  • In Australia, where Ms. Zibelman will soon run the nation’s energy markets, a company called Power Ledger announced the start of a residential electricity trading market based in blockchain last year at a housing development in Perth.
  • The ideal power system, said Richard L. Kauffman, who as the governor’s chairman of energy and finance is leading that effort, is one that combines large power plants and transmission lines with clusters of smaller-scale producer-consumers, “where electrons can flow in more than one direction and supply and demand of electricity is dynamic — and that’s different than the grid is today.”
  • The State Public Service Commission has already taken a few of them, including last week approving new ways to determine pricing for electricity from renewable energy projects that more accurately reflect the value to the grid based on geographic location, timing and other factors yet to be determined.
  • Once that occurs, Mr. Orsini said, the company will be able to facilitate the trading of energy among its participants — though they would still pay the utility, Con Edison, for infrastructure fees and services, as customers now do when they choose to use a green energy supplier through the utility.

Dozens of homes and businesses in Brooklyn have been wired into a microgrid, which allows members to exchange excess-electricity credits.
Continue reading “Solar Experiment Lets Neighbors Trade Energy Among Themselves”

Most Viable Use for Blockchain Might Be in Creation of World’s Largest Supercomputer

  • In fact, the most natural and immediately viable use for Blockchain may be in the creation of the world’s largest supercomputer via distributed computation.
  • Because of that, users who are not maximizing their computational power can make some money on the side by renting computer power via a peer-to-peer Blockchain network and make a little side cash.
  • The overall effect of such a system would be massive computing power, beyond the scale of any available system.
  • Because of the nature of the Blockchain with distributed ledgers, the computation could actually be shifted to where data is being processed and therefore avoid the inevitable lag that happens with centralized cloud servers.
  • The flexibility of the distributed ledger system means that each user could have a simple account, with dynamic pricing driven by feedback.

The most natural and immediately viable use for Blockchain may be in the creation of the world’s largest supercomputer via distributed computation.
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Jordan Peele: ‘Black Voices Will Tell Good Stories Just Like Anybody Else’

Jordan Peele: ‘Black voices will tell good stories just like anybody else'

  • Jordan Peele says that while he is grateful for the recognition he has received for “Get Out,” the film’s success proves a valuable lesson about the ability of black films and filmmakers.
  • “When you give black voices a platform and the opportunity to tell our story, we will tell good stories just like anybody else,” Peele said in a recent interview with The Hollywood Reporter.
  • “The power of story and the power of a well-crafted film or television show is really all you need to speak to people,” Peele said in the interview.
  • This is precisely why he thinks “Get Out” was so successful: it flipped the usual narrative around horror films by featuring a black man as the protagonist and victim as opposed to a white woman.
  • Read more on Peele’s thoughts about black films, his opinion on slavery movies and how he felt turning down “SNL” at The Hollywood Reporter.

You can say that again.
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Solar Experiment Lets Neighbors Trade Energy Among Themselves

Dozens of homes and businesses in Brooklyn have been wired into a microgrid, which allows members to exchange excess-electricity credits.
Continue reading “Solar Experiment Lets Neighbors Trade Energy Among Themselves”

Solar Experiment Lets Neighbors Trade Energy Among Themselves

  • Across the globe, upstart companies like LO3 Energy, which is designing the Brooklyn experiment with the industrial giant Siemens, are building digital networks that offer the promise of user-driven, decentralized energy systems that can work in tandem with the traditional large-scale grid or, especially in emerging economies, avoid the need for a grid at all.
  • In Australia, where Ms. Zibelman will soon run the nation’s energy markets, a company called Power Ledger announced the start of a residential electricity trading market based in blockchain last year at a housing development in Perth.
  • The ideal power system, said Richard L. Kauffman, who as the governor’s chairman of energy and finance is leading that effort, is one that combines large power plants and transmission lines with clusters of smaller-scale producer-consumers, “where electrons can flow in more than one direction and supply and demand of electricity is dynamic — and that’s different than the grid is today.”
  • The State Public Service Commission has already taken a few of them, including last week approving new ways to determine pricing for electricity from renewable energy projects that more accurately reflect the value to the grid based on geographic location, timing and other factors yet to be determined.
  • Once that occurs, Mr. Orsini said, the company will be able to facilitate the trading of energy among its participants — though they would still pay the utility, Con Edison, for infrastructure fees and services, as customers now do when they choose to use a green energy supplier through the utility.

Brooklyn is known the world over for things small-batch and local, like designer clogs, craft bourbon and artisanal sauerkraut.
Continue reading “Solar Experiment Lets Neighbors Trade Energy Among Themselves”

Solar Experiment Lets Neighbors Trade Energy Among Themselves

Dozens of homes and businesses in Brooklyn have been wired into a microgrid, which allows members to exchange excess-electricity credits.
Continue reading “Solar Experiment Lets Neighbors Trade Energy Among Themselves”