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  • China’s emergence as the world’s second-largest economy — a historic boom that pulled about 800 million Chinese out of dire poverty while simultaneously putting downward pressure on wages across the world’s wealthiest countries — is arguably the most important economic story in the last 50 years.
  • Along with consolidating President Xi Xinping’s already significant power over China’s ruling party, the highly secretive, twice-a-decade Communist Party Congress, which will start Wednesday, is sure to focus on grinding out more economic growth.
  • To that end, Xinping is also expected to focus on strengthening the party’s grip over significant swaths of the economy, including industries like energy, banking and telecommunication industries.
  • The government hopes to “coax” additional capital investment — that is things like plants, infrastructure and real estate — into the economy from private players.
  • But if you look across global markets, you can see that capital doesn’t necessarily want to cooperate, and in fact, appears eager to slip the grip of the party.

China’s emergence as the world’s second-largest economy — a historic boom that pulled about 800 million Chinese out of dire poverty while simultaneously putting downward pressure on wages across the world’s wealthiest countries — is arguably the most important economic story in the last 50 years. But where does […]

China’s emergence as the world’s second-largest economy — a historic boom that pulled about 800 million Chinese out of dire poverty while simultaneously putting downward pressure on wages across the world’s wealthiest countries — is arguably the most important economic story in the last 50 years.

But where does China go from here? Its economy has slowed from a breakneck annual pace of between 12 and 14 percent a decade ago, to a more stable rate of roughly 6.9 percent, according to the somewhat-fudged official statistics.

Along with consolidating President Xi Xinping’s already significant power over China’s ruling party, the highly secretive, twice-a-decade Communist Party Congress, which will start Wednesday, is sure to focus on grinding out more economic growth. To that end, Xinping is also expected to focus on strengthening the party’s grip over significant swaths of the economy, including industries like energy, banking and telecommunication industries. The government hopes to “coax” additional capital investment — that is things like plants, infrastructure and real estate — into the economy from private players.

But if you look across global markets, you can see that capital doesn’t necessarily want to cooperate, and in fact, appears eager to slip the grip of the party.

Sign up for our weekly newsletter tracking the Trump administration.